Fenderesky Gallery Belfast – Group exhibition, 28 Nov 2019 – 25 Jan 2020

Forty four works of art, the oldest Abstract Painting 81  by Charles Walsh  is a replay of sensitivity to shades of black, an ability  to recognise  quite a multitude of black shades noted by F. Engels among the workers in chemical industry. I compared once  the Walsh’s mastery to graduate the hue to a whisper in a nursery.  It also ages remarkably well, while turning into a classic.

Charles Walsh, Abstract Painting 81, 2011, oil on linen

The installation is airy, “minimalist”, allowing the privacy between the viewer and the viewed, not on offer in most current exhibitions of visual art.  The images do not rain on you, do not jostle for an aura, even if some were given preference for taller visitors.  That little speck above the row of three, is a small  Seed of painting by Natalia Black. It is her autograph, pastose layers of paints dragged across a thought of composition.  She is not alone in preferring this specific technique for its power to define an image by pushing out the ground and instances. I came across three more painters who are devotees.

 

 

Conrad Jon Godly  applies impasto  to mountains on large scale to reveal their “spirit”.

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Iranian Salman Khoshroo ( https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/12/enormous-palette-knife-portraits-and-figures-by-salman-khoshroo/) had made white on white series, switching now to hot hues charged with defining male nudes.  Joseph Lee  (http://www.josephleeart.com)  prefers portraits whose anatomy is masked by forces of emotion.

Downstairs, a tiny  Spiral Star by Dan Shipsides silently plays hide and seek well above the eye level, while the large Rattler and Badass by Ronnie Hughes command the whole space and attention with support of seven smaller  paintings. Small format is favoured by many,  by  Fionnuala D’Arcy, whose paintings appear both here and upstairs. 

Rigorous process feeds the variations on sensuality of the sameness of the format – akin to a musical fugue. The attention to the medium allows the sense of atmosphere to engulf sharp edges of  angular forms. I deliberately avoid to identify these images as made by female or male artist.  Instead, I hope the viewer to engage with it, with the painting, not with the maker, as is the habit in this culture.  “In 2018, male artists created 95 percent of the total value of art sold at major auction houses across the world. And from 2008 to 2018, only 11 percent of the artworks actually bought by major American museums were by women. The art world can posture but, where it counts, less is changing than it might seem, because the underlying idea of the Artistic Genius maintains its hold.”

Louise Wallace

Peter Burns prefers similarly hot palette to stretch, ambulate and contort his busy landscape.

Scenic elements hide a seek on a diaphanous layered surfaces  of David Crone‘s paintings. David Feely intoxicates the rule of right angle with letting the observed to hover between figuration and abstraction.

David Crone

 

David Feely

Reduced composition  intimates rather than narrate a story  in several exhibits. It appears as preferred mode  of Wilma Vissers   and Felim Egan.

Felim Egan, Prelude, 2010, above it is Vilma Visser’s Utitled, 2019
Installation view with Helen O’Leary’ Air Scale, 2019
Helen O’Leary, Air Scale, 2019

Languid misty high tones embrace the right angles with empathetic tenderness.

Tender delight with details keeps them mischievously playing hide and seek with  meaning, date and technique in the page manquee below.

Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Haiku, 2018

When abstraction borrows enigmatic quality from an imagined story or performance, it contaminates itself with a narrative. The freedom of choice is left with the viewer’s imaginative habits.

Sinead Aldridge, Sermon to Stones, 2019

Holding the imagination to revoke the real, is often assisted by illusion of space, depth, here between the figure absorbed in contemplation of the cloud and its reflection in the water while that illusion is targeted by the red tree.  It is poetic  to the point of sweet illusion,  perhaps hence the smirking right angle  to subvert it a little.

Paddy McCann, The Cloud in the River, 2017
David Crone, Garden Objects,2015
Top: Helen Blake, Blush, 2019, below Walker&Walker, In Between  o and r

Installation shots.

Shrinking the world to a table op scale is a pre-eminent part of growing up while playing, or playing while growing up. The value of play for cognitive powers is well understood but not often respected. Art has the eternal power to object on its behalf.

Peter Hutchinson, Rounded Square, 2019

Visual art shrinks not from being decorative  while it distances itself from similarity with the observed.

Patrick Fitzgerald, Coast, 2018

If only rarely, the fear of the end of the world visits people every so many hundreds of years – and the humanity’s impact on nature  at present triggers our take on it. The metaphor of darkness,  of a night for end of life is not out of date yet.

James Allen,The last bird in the world leaving, 2018

As if not facing the predicted impact of people on nature, art still potently flirts with  freedom of thought,  be it as a nod to predecessor or to the enigmatic quality of colour.

Tony Hill, Light, 2019
Tony Hill, After Georges Braque,2019

It is perhaps telling about human condition  when the  Shelter, 2019 by Zoe Murdoch  has no opening, no entrance. A closed box on a pedestal.

Closed form also governs  Bill Saunders’s Hide Tide, 2019

 

Visual art often partners ethics, even if it not exactly follows the kallos agathos…

Images courtesy of Helen G Blake on Facebook.  Without you, Helen, I could not do this essay. Thank you.

Published by

Slavka Sverakova

writer on art

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